Happy Holidays | Office Closures

The doctors and staff at Fairgrounds Animal Hospital would like to wish you, your family, and your pets a safe and happy holiday season.

Happy New Year's - Fairgrounds Animal Hospital

Office Closures for the Holidays

Our staff would like to remind you that our office will be closed on Thursday, December 24, 2020, and Friday, December 25, 2020, to celebrate the holiday. Our office will re-open on Monday, December 28, 2020, at 7:30 a.m.

Our office will also be closed on New Year’s Day, Friday, January 1, 2020, and will re-open on Monday, January 4, 2020 at 7:30 a.m.


If your pet experiences an emergency during our holiday closures, please contact Animal Emergency Center located at 6425 S. Virginia Street, Reno, NV 89511 at (775) 851-3600.

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Pet Dental Health: Why does it cost so much to clean my pet’s teeth?

The veterinary team at Fairgrounds Animal Hospital is proud of our gold standard or care for our patients along with our use of fear free techniques.
With this in mind:
• We advise that all pets are seen by their veterinarian for a preventative exam which includes a thorough assessment of major body systems, including the heart, lungs, eyes, ears and mouth annually or every 6 months if they are 6 years or older, or a senior pet. This assists our veterinary team with creating the best anesthetic plan for each patient and provides a complete picture of each patient’s health.
• We keep our treatment rooms stocked with clearly labeled vital supplies readily available in case of an emergency.
• Our hospital is kept sanitary with frequent hand-washing and the use of antibacterial agents to disinfect all patient areas.
• Our veterinary team is trained in fear free techniques which includes proper restraint and humane handling techniques to ensure that every patient is treated with compassion and feels comfortable and safe while receiving the medical care they need.
• Our veterinary team provides client education and a full estimate with a low and high end for every procedure performed in our hospital. We strongly believe that going over any questions that you may have and educating you about your pet’s health and procedure will ease any anxiety that you may have about your pet’s general health and the care that they will receive in our hospital, as well as assist you with making the most informed decision possible in terms of your pets care.
• Our veterinary team will always offer preventative options for several reasons, first and most importantly to benefit the overall health of your pet and second to prevent unnecessary follow up visits if possible. Which can be costly to you and stressful for your pet. For example, if your pet requires extractions, it is recommended that is done during their teeth cleaning as opposed to making several visits. Continue…

Your Pet’s Dental Consultation: What to Expect

Your Pet’s Consultation: What to Expect

Maybe you’ve noticed your dog or cat has some killer breath lately, seen brown tartar on their teeth, or have been enlightened on the great importance of your pet’s dental health and you want to know where to start. Next, you find out we offer complimentary dental consultations and you schedule one to get your pet on the path to a beautiful smile! You may wonder, what will happen during this visit? First, you should plan to spend about 15-30 minutes from checking in at the reception desk to completing the consult in the exam room. After check in, a technician will greet you in the room, examine your pet’s teeth and gums to assess the level of dental disease already present (if any), and ask you some questions to get an idea of your lifestyle and needs. She may ask about your pet’s dental homecare regimen, what you feed them, and if you’ve noticed any behaviors that might indicate oral discomfort.

If your pet just has mild tartar, your technician will recommend a dental scaling and polishing to remove the hardened build up that won’t come off with brushing. Unfortunately, pets won’t tolerate a scaling and cleaning while awake, so general anesthesia will be needed! Your technician can give you an estimate for the whole procedure after she assesses your pet’s teeth, and she can walk you through the process so you can feel at ease knowing your furry family member will be given the best care to ensure they are safe and comfortable. If your technician notices any teeth that are suspicious and may be dead or abscessed, it can be confirmed with radiographs during the cleaning. Also, some teeth that appear normal during the consult can be revealed by pocket probing and radiographs to be dead or infected at the root! Any bad teeth that need to be extracted can be done painlessly by aid of a local nerve block while your pet is under general anesthesia for their cleaning. Your technician can include in your cleaning estimate an approximate range of the additional time and cost expected for extractions.

Your Pet’s Dental Procedure: What to Expect

Even if there are teeth that need to be extracted, never fear! Your pet can emerge from a dental cleaning and extractions with a clean bill of oral health and a fresh start. Dogs and cats can still live normal happy lives and even eat hard food with missing teeth—in fact, they will be far more comfortable eating without those painful dead or abscessed teeth in the way! Good oral health can drastically improve quality of life and extend your pet’s lifespan, so don’t hesitate to call us for your complimentary dental consult today!

To MicroChip or Not to MicroChip?

A Look Into Microchipping Your Pet

September is travel safety and microchip awareness month at Fairgrounds Animal Hospital, so let’s start by talking microchips! We know you might be wondering what a microchip is, and why you would want one for your pet. Microchips are essentially an ID tag that can never fall off or be taken away if your pet is ever lost or kidnapped—unlike the tags on his or her collar. It is not a tracking device, but it can still dramatically increase the odds that a lost or kidnapped pet will make it back home! A microchip can be scanned at any vet clinic or animal shelter, and the staff makes sure to scan every pet that is new to them during the first visit. A microchip implanted on your pet will be registered under your name, and as long as you update the associated company with changes in your phone number and address, it will have your current contact information attached. Many, many lost or kidnapped pets have been returned home safely because they had a registered microchip in place!

Continue…

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posted in:  Microchips  |  Pet Safety

Happy Labor Day| Office Closures

The doctors and staff at Fairgrounds Animal Hospital would like to wish you, your family, and your pets a safe and happy Fourth of July holiday.

Office Closures for the Holiday

Our staff would like to remind you that our office will be closed on Monday, September 7, 2020, to observe the Fourth of July holiday. Our office will re-open on Tuesday, September 8, 2020, at 7:30 a.m. Continue…

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Create Your Pet’s Playlist While You Wait

With our new procedures in place for Covid 19 we know it can be tough to have to wait for your pet. While you wait, consider creating a Spotify playlist for your pet to jam out to on the way home. Spotify allows you to curate a playlist for your pet. You can use your existing Spotify account or if you do not have an account you can create a free one in minutes. The music streaming service also released some not-so-surprising results of a study they conducted on how pet owners use music with their companion animals.

Spotify included 5,000 users from around the world in their survey. They discovered that 71% of participants play music for their pets. Other interesting facts included:

  • 8 in 10 pet owners believe their pets like music
  • 69% of pet owners sing to their pet
  • 57% of owners dance with their pet
  • 55% of owners think their

Let’s find out what Fairgrounds pet owners think:

According to the study, classical and soft rock are the top two genres that pets prefer. Bob Marley, Elvis, Freddy Mercury, Bowie and Ozzy are the top five artist-inspired pet names.

Head to spotify.com/pets and enter a few details about your pet. You can choose between a dog, cat, hamster, iguana or bird. Sadly, there are no rabbits or other animals at this time.

Once you enter your pet’s details Spotify will figure out what your pet’s playlist should be based on their personality and your listening history and presto your pet has a playlist to jam out to for the car ride home.

Share Your Results With Us!!

Find us on Facebook and Instagram @Fairgrounds Animal Hospital

Once you have set up your pet’s playlist, head over to our Facebook page and share your pet’s playlist and see what other Fairgrounds pets like to rock out to.

Below is a playlist that we set-up for Rosie, one of our team members dogs.

IT WORKS!! We have confirmed that Rosie is in fact an Elvis Costello and Patti Smith fan.

Here is a preview of Rosie’s playlist. Enjoy.

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Covid 19 Precautions

 We want to reach out to all our pet parents with an update. Fairgrounds Animal Hospital will be staying open to attend to your pet’s needs. We request that you be patient with our staff as we are working diligently to keep our you and them, as safe as possible when bringing your pet to us. Here are some temporary adjustments that you need to be aware of when arriving.

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Curbside Pick-up Available

Curbside pickup is available at Fairgrounds Animal Hospital for your pets food and prescriptions. Call in your order to our hospital at (775) 329-4106 and we’ll Bring It Right to Your Car. Store hours: Monday-Friday (7:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.), Saturday (8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.).

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What is Canine Parvovirus?

What is Parvovirus?

  • The highly contagious virus that can infect puppies (most commonly under the age of 5 months), dogs and wild canines (coyotes, foxes, wolves, etc.)
  • Several variants of CPV-2 (CPV-2a, 2b, 2c); although symptoms are relatively similar
  • Intestinal parvovirus (most common) and Cardiac parvovirus

How is Parvovirus spread?

  • HIGHLY CONTAGIOUS 
  • Spread through dog to dog contact, environment, infected stool, and people
  • The virus can lay dormant in kennels, water bowls, on leashes, clothing/hands of people who come in contact with infected dogs and several other surfaces. 
  • Can survive in the environment for extended periods of time and is resistant to heat, cold, and dry environments
  • Dogs can transfer the disease through their hair, or feet
  • Virus travels in the bloodstream
    • First attacks tonsils and lymph nodes in the mouth
    • Then travels via lymphocytes to the bloodstream
    • Once in the bloodstream, virus attacks rapidly dividing cells (cells that line the intestinal tract, bone marrow, and heart)
    • Breaks down the lining of gut-unable to absorb nutrients and eventually leads to severe diarrhea and vomiting 
    • Breaks down the immune system; Can lead to sepsis

What dogs are most at risk?

  • All dogs are at risk (Da2pp vx helps prevent, but does not make them immune) 
  • Puppies under 5 months old are the most at risk; dogs that have not received an adequate amount of Da2pp vx are also highly at risk
  • Some breeds thought to be more at risk
    • Pitbull terriers
    • German shepherds
    • Rottweilers (sorry Sharon)
    • Doberman pinschers (sorry CMA)
    • Labs
  • Breeds at less risk (compared to breeds listed above)
    • Toy poodles and cocker spaniels

Symptoms of Parvovirus

  • Lethargy
  • Vomiting 
  • Diarrhea-often bloody 
  • inappetence
  • Hypothermia/hyperthermia 
  • Bloated/painful abdomen
  • Red gums
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Symptoms typically appear within 4-14 days after incubation period; virus is shed in feces 4-5 days post-exposure and can continue to be shed 2-3 weeks after recovery 
  • Most deaths occur within 2-3 days if not treated properly (many can die even after receiving proper treatment)

How is Parvovirus diagnosed and treated?

  • Suspected based on dogs history 
    • Vaccine status
    • Age
    • Environment
  • SNAP Parvo test/fecal tests
    • Detects shedding virus particles in the feces
    • Peak shedding occurs 4-7 days post-infection; the chance that test could come back negative and retesting several days later can result in a positive test
  • CBC tests 
    • Virus attacks WBC, results in a low WBC count on CBC
  • Treated with IV fluids, IV injections, antibiotics, etc.
    • IV fluids, maropitant, antibiotic injections
    • Famotidine 
      • Used to reduce stomach acid
    • None of these treatments cure or kill the disease; supportive measures to help stabilize the animal until the immune system can recover
    • Antibiotics are commonly used throughout treatment; will not kill the virus but can help prevent the victim from being infected by other bacterial infections while the immune system is compromised
  • The high success rate of recovery for patients that are treated at the hospital, however not guaranteed (roughly 80-90%) 
  • Vaccinate dogs every 3-4 weeks starting at 6/8 weeks of age. Continue until 20 weeks old, then yearly boosters for rest of life
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Preventative Care Tips to Keep Your Dog Happy and Healthy

Annual preventative care wellness exams with your veterinarian is the best way to keep your pet healthy and happy. The vet will check the physical condition of your dog in the first visit to diagnose any problems. Routine lab tests are able to detect early stages of disease. Our hospital is able to conduct various types of tests with the latest technology. Early check-ups will help to diagnose any problems at an early stage which will help your dog live a longer and happier life. 

 

Vaccinations

Vaccination is the best way to protect your dog from many diseases such as cough, rabies, and distemper. Dogs can be immunized against canine flu and Lyme disease. Consult your veterinarian about the vaccines that are best for your pet for their age, health status and exposure. 

 

Grooming Routine 

Ear cleaning, trimming or nails, and coat brushing are all beneficial for your dog. Visit your veterinarian on a regular basis and consult your veterinarian on how to clean your dog’s ears safely. Discharge from ears can be an indication of an infection. Trimming of nails will keep them away from infection and also help your pet to walk normally. If you brush their hair daily, it will prevent mats and help to detect skin problems early. 

 

Protection from Parasites

Fleas, ticks, heartworms and intestinal parasites can result in major health consequences for your dog. However, these can easily be prevented by the regular use of veterinary approved products. Heartworms are usually transmitted through mosquito bites. Fleas and ticks are not responsible for transmitting disease but can lead to itchy skin which can make your pet very uncomfortable. As change occurs in weather, it is quite difficult to guarantee when mosquitoes or fleas are not biting. 

 

Good Nutrition and Regular Exercise for Your Pet 

Balanced nutrition is the best key to keeping your pet healthy. Try to maintain a high-quality diet that addresses your pet’s specific health needs, breed, activity level and age. Regular exercise is another vital factor that keeps your dog healthy and active. Discuss a diet and exercise plan for your dog with your veterinarian. 

 

Dental Care 

Taking care of your dog’s teeth is also necessary. Brush your dog’s teeth twice a week with an edible toothpaste recommended by your veterinarian. An annual dental check-up is also recommended as part of your pets wellness exam. 

 

 

Taking good care of your dog is vital to maintain the overall health of your dog. Fairgrounds Animal Hospital delivers unique services ranging from vaccines to surgery. We love caring for your pets. Our veterinarians and staff are skilled and efficient in delivering exceptional health services for your pet. We deliver one on one personalized care for your pets to make them feel at home. Call us today at (775) 329-4106 to schedule a preventative care exam for your pet.