Why Spay or Neuter Your Pet?

Dr. Katie Cox explains why you should spay or neuter your pet.

When you bring your puppy and kitten to the veterinarian’s office for a check-up, one of the recommendations may be to spay or neuter your new pet. Spaying and neutering dogs and cats has many medical and behavioral benefits that can enhance the quality of life and lifespan of your beloved pet.

The most commonly known reason to spay and neuter dogs and cats is to decrease the number of un-adopted pets in the United States. While spaying your female dog or cat does indeed eliminate the chances of an unwanted pregnancy, it can also stop a female from going into heat two to three times a year. Another strong argument for spaying females is the prevention of a pyometra, or an infected uterus.  A pyometra occurs only in intact (non-spayed) females because of the hormones from the ovaries. This can lead to a life-threatening infection that requires emergency surgery to fix.  Spaying females can also decrease chances of cancerous mammary tumors. Continue…

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posted in:  Pet Health  |  Pet Surgery

An Inside Look at Your Pet’s Spay or Neuter

By Tamara Kees

spay neuter fairgorunds animal hospital    To help you feel more comfortable and knowledgeable about the spay and neuter procedure, let’s do a walk through of the day of surgery! Your pet will be fasted the night prior to surgery to reduce incidence of stomach upset from the anesthetics used during the procedure. When you come to check in, you’ll discuss the surgery, sign authorization forms, and ask any questions you like with your pet’s technician before leaving your pet safely in their arms. After check-in, your pet will be examined by the doctor to ensure he or she is in good health to proceed. Ideally, a small blood panel and ECG will be run with your approval, to ensure the health of the heart and organs before surgery. Our goal is to reduce risk of complications as much as possible to keep your pet safe, so this information helps us make the best decisions about what anesthetics to use on each patient and what pain medications will be safe to prescribe for a smooth and comfortable recovery at home. Continue…

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posted in:  Pet Health  |  Pet Surgery

Spay Neuter After Care

What to Expect:

Spay Procedure Fairgrounds Animal HospitalKnowing what to expect for your pet’s spay neuter procedure will make the process much less stressful. Here is what you can expect for your pets spay or neuter. Please call our office or stop by if you have questions about spaying or neutering your pet or would like to schedule an appointment.

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posted in:  Pet Health  |  Pet Surgery

Summer Pet Safety Tips

is your pet safe this summer - fairgorunds animal hospitalThere are many things to think about this summer in terms of keeping your pet safe. Here are some summer pet safety tips that we here at Fairgrounds Animal Hospital hope will keep your pets happy, healthy and having fun:

Do You Take Your Pet Camping or Hiking?

Great! Please make sure they are covered when it comes to ticks and heartworms. There are most likely mosquitoes where you are pitching your tent, and mosquitoes are the carrier for heartworm that can be life threatening for dogs and cats. Ticks have been seen in our area, and are certainly in the mountains and forests. If a tick is on your dog for more than 24 hours, it can transmit disease.  Continue…

Urgent Care and Walk-In Exams

If you notice your animal has a wound, please call Fairgrounds Animal Hospital at 775-329-4106 and bring your animal in for an Urgent Care exam.

In addition to scheduled appointments, the Doctors at Fairgrounds Animal Hospital also see Urgent care/walk-in exams on a daily basis. Dog and cat fight wounds and bites are unfortunately a frequent occurrence we see year-round. Often times, the fight may be between animals from the same family but can also be from another dog at the dog park or walking along the street. It is important to keep your animals updated on his or her rabies vaccine in case they are bit by another animal or they bite another dog, cat or human, as this can lead to state-regulated quarantine or, in the unfortunate case of an un-vaccinated pet, euthanasia. Continue…

Pet Obesity is a Year Round Concern for Pets

October may be over, but concern for pet obesity isn’t over! Many pets are overweight or obese, which can cause some significant problems if not addressed.

How do I know if my pet is obese?

Typically, your veterinarian will look for three main physical characteristics to determine your pet’s body condition score (BCS). BCS is graded on a scale of 1-9, with 1 being severely underweight, 4-5 being ideal, and 8-9 being obese. The first thing to consider is fat deposits along the chest. When you feel along your pet’s chest, your fingers should bump along the ribs underneath the skin and a thin layer of fat. If you can’t feel your pet’s ribs, they likely are overweight. The next two characteristics go together, and they form your pet’s waist. Looking at your pet from above, the chest should be the widest point, and the body should narrow in front of the hips/hind legs. Similarly, from the side, your pet’s chest should be the deepest point, and the abdomen should tuck up in front of the hips. Continue…

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posted in:  Pet Obesity

Dog Flu – Canine Influenza

 

Canine Influenza (Dog Flu) is an influenza occurring in dogs and canine animals. Canine influenza is caused by varieties on influenzavirus A, such as equine influenza virus H3N8, which in 2004 was discovered to cause disease in dogs. Because of lack of previous exposure to the virus, dogs have no natural immunity to it. Because of this, the disease spreads rapidly through individual dogs.

There is currently an outbreak of Canine Influenza in the Reno/ Sparks area. Because Canine Influenza is extremely contagious, it is recommended that owners avoid taking their dogs to public places for now. It is also recommended to vaccinate your dogs against Canine Influenza. Many boarding and grooming facilities are now requiring that dogs are vaccinated against Canine Influenza.

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posted in:  Vaccines

Pain Management for Feline Stomatitis

Simon receives laser therapy at Fairgrounds Animal Hospital to provide pain management for feline stomatitis.

What Is Feline Stomatitis?

Feline stomatitis is a severe, painful inflammation of a cat’s mouth and gums. In most cases, the condition causes ulcers to form in the mouth; these ulcers can involve the lips, tongue, gums, and back of the throat. Cats of any age or breed can be affected.

  • Feline stomatitis is a severe, painful inflammation of a cat’s mouth and gums.
  • Dental disease, certain viruses, and some other inflammatory conditions can cause feline stomatitis.
  • The long-term outcome can vary. Many cats require long-term treatment to control the condition.

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Ultrasounds at Fairgrounds Animal Hospital

A pet ultrasound at Fairgrounds Animal Hospital.

Ultrasounds are used at Fairgrounds Animal Hospital to diagnose or rule out many issues and conditions.

Are you curious about pet ultrasounds?

There are many reasons that your pet’s veterinarian might request to do an ultrasound for your pet. Veterinary medicine has come leaps and bounds in the past 20 years—and the ultrasound is a prime example of one of the most useful advances. Thanks to ultrasound, we can look inside the body where we used to have to go in surgically to explore. Ultrasound works by bouncing sound waves off of the tissues and creating an image. The lighter the color, the more dense the tissue. Ultrasounds are difficult to interpret and require a trained specialist’s eye. Ultrasound is useful for diagnosing or ruling out many issues and conditions, including liver and kidney issues, pregnancy, bladder or kidney stones, and tumors. Ultrasound also reveals the density, size, shape, and position of organs in the abdomen to look for abnormalities that could lead to a diagnosis without the need for exploratory surgery.

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Starting Good Dental Habits Early Cat and Dog Teeth Cleaning

By Tamara Kees

Brushing your pet’s teeth is the first step for dental care for your pet.

Good pet dental care is as important for our pets as it is for us, and starting early makes it a healthy habit your dog or cat is far more likely to tolerate!

Cat & Dog Teeth Cleaning is Important! Good Pet Dental Care Will Help Keep Your Pet Healthy!!!

For puppies and kittens, starting out with quick sessions can be a good way to gently introduce the idea of brushing. Using tuna juice or pet toothpaste on a little piece of gauze with your finger at first, and then working up to a toothbrush as your pet gets used to the concept is a good, gradual way to go. Rewarding with a lot of praise and treats also positively reinforces the experience! Brushing only really needs to be done for about 30 seconds each side, in 5-10 second chunks. The sides of the teeth facing the cheek are what you primarily should focus on, since the tongue constantly rubs that inner surface of the teeth. Brushing every day is optimal, but even brushing 3 times a week will make a huge difference in oral health. With practice, consistency, and patience, many pets come to tolerate brushing very well—and some really enjoy it! Continue…